Tuesday, February 26, 2013

Fashion OR Faux pas?

Dolce & Gabbana released their Autumn/Winter 2013 line at the recent Milan Fashion Week, among other big name designers, such as Emporio Armani & Jil Sander.
























According to InStyle.Co.UK's coverage (read the full article HERE) of the show: "Dolce & Gabbana added a bit of spice to proceedings with a Byzantium meets Vatican theme played out to the sounds of The Spice Girls. With mosaic vistas appearing in intricately appliqu├ęd golden gowns or printed on shrug-on jersey column dresses, we’ve no doubt Hollywood’s finest would have worn it straight of the catwalk."
















Be sure to check the tag of your bishop or priest's vestments next Sunday; look for this symbol (view above):




Both for the Women's & Men's line, Dolce & Gabbana added a religious theme with images of Byzantine Orthodox icons/frescos, Catholic statues of the Virgin Mary, ornate Orthodox crosses, and imperial crowns.

From their own press release for the new collection:

"Domenico Dolce & Stefano Gabbana were inspired by the mosaic of Monreale for this collection. The city of Monreale started to become important around the XI century with the arrival of the Normans in Sicily. The Cathedral of Monreale, consecrated to Santa Maria Nuova, was built between 1172 and 1185 under the commission of the Norman King William II of Altavilla, together with the archiepiscopal Palace and its beautiful cloister. Two of these mosaics represent William II crowned by Christ and William II who offers the church to the Virgin. Local artists and experts from Byzantium and Venice were called in to realize those striking works of art. Dolce & Gabbana made use of the abilities of artisans of the highest level to create mosaics on shoes, dresses, jewels and bags. As the art of mosaic-making is a slow and precise one, achieved by placing single piece next to the other, at the same time tailoring is made by single stitch after single stitch."

Below are a few examples from the collection; to view the entire collection (and I suggest you do so), visit HERE and HERE:

















- A Day in the Life of the Youth Director